Masters of Engineering Bursary Programme

PAMSA’s Process Research Unit
In August 2019, the 2018/2019 cohort of Masters students presented their research work to a panel of industry experts. You could be there next year!

PAMSA BURSARY PROGRAMME

Through PAMSA’s Process Research Unit, BSc chemical engineering graduates or students in their final year of study are able to take their studies to a Masters level thanks to the PAMSA M.Eng. Bursary Programme and PAMSA’s member companies. 

Awarded to a limited number of students annually, each bursary is valued at R130,000 per year for two years of full-time study towards a M.Eng. degree at participating universities, namely Pretoria, Stellenbosch, Wits and North West.

Successful candidates gain advanced skills during their post-graduate training in specialist fields such as wood science, chemical analysis, material and energy balances, process modelling, material flow analysis and separation techniques. 

APPLICATION CRITERIA
Please ensure that you meet the qualifying criteria below before applying.

Applications are welcome from chemical engineering students who meet the following requirements:

  • BSc. Eng. graduates and final year BSc. Eng. (chemical engineering) students interested in enrolling for M.Eng. studies in the bio-technology space of the pulp, paper and packaging industry.
  • A good academic record, subject to a 60% average in your final year of study.
  • Applicants should have completed their B.Sc in five years or less.
  • Candidates should indicate their areas of interest, for example energy efficiency, renewable energy and biopolymers etc.
  • South African citizenship an advantage.

Interviews will be held with selected candidates.

Other terms and conditions may apply.

STUDENTS AND THEIR STORIES

Changing the value of waste

Meet Josh Nel, a chemical engineering student at the University of Stellenbosch. He applied for the waste valorisation option and has been learning about various methods of recycling plastic and paper waste ever since. His topic involves comparing the technical and economic feasibility of two valorisation techniques. The first technique is the reverse engineering/pyrolysis of a waste stream, mainly comprising plastic and paper, back into petrochemicals.

More than paper

As PAMSA sponsored M.Eng. students, Liezl van der Watt, Chelaine Maree and Qiniso Ngiba share their experiences and what their pieces of research entail. And yes, we agree, paper is cool!

Opening doors by making doors with mill waste

Eddie Barnard is currently in his second and final year of his Masters of Engineering. He has been focusing on the valorisation of pulp and paper mill waste. His end goal is to find uses for it in biocomposites with similar qualities of particle board. Examples of applications would be furniture and cupboard doors.